St. Luke’s Episcopal Church prepares to celebrate its third annual Recovery Sunday in memory of those struggling with mental health and addiction. The church has called on people to write prayers on cloth used as prayer flags to commemorate Recovery Month.

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Jamestown hopes to raise awareness of mental health and increase community understanding of the problem of addiction.

The church, in partnership with the Mental Health Association, will hold an event this weekend to commemorate the 53 drug overdose victims of the past year.

The Church has hosted a variety of mental health and recovery focused services over the years before establishing an annual tradition, but this year marks the Church’s third Recovery Sunday.

“Addiction and recovery isn’t just someone else’s problem. It’s our problem.” Luke Fodor, pastor of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, said: “We wanted to make sure the community had this as part of their collective memory.”

Minister for Children, Youth and Families Jessica Frederick said the church will honor drug overdose victims by hanging prayer flags from the top of the bell tower to the church’s main street entrance for this weekend’s event. rice field.

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church prepares to celebrate its third annual Recovery Sunday in memory of those struggling with mental health and addiction. The church has called on people to write prayers on cloth used as prayer flags to commemorate Recovery Month.

She said strips of cloth were written in honor of those who died of drug overdoses in the past year.

“Each strip contains a prayer for those who have passed away and for the healing and wholeness of the recovery community. We encouraged people to write their prayers on strips of cloth.”

recovery sunday event

This year, the St. Luke’s Restoration Sunday event will begin on Saturday.

“We made an entire weekend out of it” Fodor said. “Saturday will start with an art recovery show.”

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church prepares to celebrate its third annual Recovery Sunday in memory of those struggling with mental health and addiction.The church has called on people to write prayers on cloth to be used as prayer flags in honor of Recovery Month. Photo of PJ by Timothy Flood

Fodor said arts and recovery classes, in partnership with the Mental Health Association, work on the arts throughout the year and will be on display at St. Luke’s Undercroft on Saturday at 7 p.m.

Food and refreshments are served at the event, which celebrates the church’s second year of art exhibition.

Some of the art from the show will also be featured in the Sunday morning service of Saint Luke.

Fodor said one of the pieces featured in the church will be inspired by the Anger Workshop.

“Sometimes we control our anger.” He said. “We are not really dealing with it and it happens at unforeseen times.”

An art therapy workshop offered this year allowed people to express their anger through art rather than actions. The art is displayed in front of the altar on Restoration Sunday of St. Luke.

As part of Sunday services, church bells ring in memory of each person who has died from a drug overdose in the past year. The service will incorporate candlelight, reading the names or initials of drug overdose victims, and special music by people who have recovered from addiction.

After the service, there will be Narkan training. Art exhibitions from Saturday’s event are also open to the public before and after Sunday services. Additionally, Father Bernard’s Blessed Biscuits sells biscuits after Sunday services.

“We are doing a joint venture with the Mental Health Association of Father Bernard’s Blessed Biscuits.” Fodor said. “It is a social enterprise that sells dog biscuits. I can.

The Church’s Recovery Sunday reflects St. Luke’s Anglican commitment to the idea that mental health is deeply connected to faith.

“This service is essential to the life of faith.” Fredrick said.

pursuit of recovery

Fodor believes Recovery Sunday is one way to ensure the community remembers and honors victims of substance abuse and drug overdoses.

One of the points Fodor wants to emphasize at the weekend’s event is the importance of connection.

“The opposite of addiction is connection” He said. “Often, people feel disconnected first from themselves and then from their community. So they start using different substances to deal with their pain. Whether it’s caffeine in the morning or not. I think it applies to all of us. We all use some kind of chemical to normalize our lives.”

St. Luke’s Recovery Sunday seeks to remove the stigma from people struggling with addiction and mental health.

Fodor said the community’s fear of people struggling with mental illness and substance use can cause people to judge them or label them. “Outsider”

“I hope people will understand that this is about changing your mind and taking concrete steps.” He said. “Often, the mindsets we use are part of the problem. I hope you start to realize that you are part of the problem.

Fodor acknowledged that mental health and substance abuse issues will not be resolved, “All night” He believes that by working together and being compassionate towards those struggling with addiction, the community can take steps to solve the problem.

fodor said “True Healing” People care about each other and work together to solve community problems.

faith and healing

Fodor believes that the work of mental health organizations represents the concept of resurrection and regeneration.

“Life that seemed dead comes back to life” He said.

Frederick said the church’s interactions with people who struggle with mental health problems and drug use reflect the biblical example of Jesus.

“Jesus was always spending time with people that other people wanted to overlook.” she said. “This is an integral part of our faith in seeing people as people. All were wounded and healed in some way, and that was the way Jesus saw and interacted with people.”

Fodor explained that one of the key ways to successfully navigate the battle of addiction recovery is to provide meaningful connections with people.

People may have a desire to feel, “whole,” He believes that the concept of wholeness cannot be achieved without community cooperation.

“To find it, you have to connect to something bigger than yourself.” He said.

Fodor believes that the job of making connections should be the responsibility of the church. He said churches shouldn’t expect people to come to church to ask for help, and that churches should be involved in the community.

“Jesus said, 99 sheep were fine, but one was lost.” He said. “Sometimes you just have to go out and look. By partnering with the Mental Health Association and displaying public art, we’re trying to tell and communicate, ‘Looking for the lost.'”


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By admin1