The Science of It: Coffee



JASON: Welcome back. IT science time. Today’s activity is perfect for those who like a perfect drink in the morning. Meredith: Yes, let’s have that cup of coffee. ALEX ALECCI, the first warning meteorologist to learn about the science of coffee. Alex: We are talking about something that is familiar and dear to many people, what is here?>> He is the third most consumed beverage in the world, coffee. Starting with the basics, where does coffee come from? Plants on this side. All coffee beans are born here. It is called a bean, but it is actually a seed. If you look closely here, these little seeds are made from the fruit that comes out of the leaves of this plant. That is why the small fruits are called coffee cherries. It is a red fruit containing a lot of caffeine, and it is inside the fruit. The flesh of the fruit is these tiny seeds. Let’s see what each of them are. 4 different types of very very different colors. This is an unroasted, dried bean extracted from the inside of the coffee cherry. Lightly roasted coffee. As it heats up in the oven, it gets darker and darker. CLAIRE: That’s all — ALEX: So it’s all about the same. >> Yes. Dark roast actually has the lowest amount of caffeine of the various types of coffee. Here is something similar to a pour over cup. It has beans inside and is ground to medium coarseness here. What we’re going to do is pour a little water over the top. After about 30 seconds, her CO2 inside the bean is released. If you keep pouring water at this point, your coffee will get really bitter. After taking the 32nd break, you can start pouring and continue. Alex: We’re releasing compounds. >> Yes, CO2 is first released when coffee blooms. Alex: CO2 is acidic. >> Yes. Continue pouring in circular motions until all the water is gone. Alex: I know there are many different ways to brew coffee. Is there any benefit to doing it this way? >> Yes. Most people who use traditional coffee makers are likely to use AK cups. They are good and consistent. But the problem with consistency is that you always end up with bad coffee. This gives you control to saturate your beans wonderfully so you can have the perfect cup of coffee every time. Alex: All flavors and all that. Makes sense. Where can I go to find out more about coffee? >> That’s right. Boom is currently hosting his roast show at the Science Center. They also do all sorts of other shows about food science here. They are called the Serving Up Science Show. Jason: Where can I get it? — Alex: Where can I get it? >>On our science website. Alex: Thanks for joining us, Kevin. JASON: Okay, I want coffee. If SE is required

The Science of It: Coffee

Learn all about coffee in this week’s The Science of It.

Learn all about coffee in this week’s The Science of It.



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